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Dyshidrotic Eczema on Arms

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If you have eczema, your skin is likely to be dry, itchy, and red. You may also have blisters. Dyshidrotic eczema mainly affects the hands and feet. It’s sometimes called pompholyx or vesicular palmoplantar dermatitis. It can be tricky to treat because it often comes back (recurs).

Dyshidrotic eczema on the arms is a condition that results in blistering of the skin on the palms of your hands and soles of your feet. The blisters are usually filled with clear fluid and cause itchiness, redness, scaling, and peeling skin between the toes or fingers. In more severe cases, dyshidrotic eczema may lead to cracking, fissuring, and weeping lesions. There is no cure for dyshidrosis however treatments are available that can help manage symptoms and prevent flare-ups.

If you have dyshidrotic eczema, your skin is likely to be dry, itchy, and red. You may also have blisters filled with clear fluid. The condition usually affects the palms of your hands and soles of your feet however it can occur on other parts of the body such as the fingers, toes, or even in between them. In more severe cases, cracking, fissuring (cracks in the skin), and weeping (oozing) lesions may develop which can become infected if left untreated.
There is no cure for dyshidrosis however treatments are available that can help manage symptoms and prevent flare-ups from occurring. These include:
• Wet wraps – these are used to moisturize and protect cracked or open wounds by applying a layer of wet dressing over topical medications and then wrapping affected areas in cotton gauze or an elastic bandage material like an ACE wrap
• Topical corticosteroids – these are anti-inflammatory drugs that come in cream or ointment form that helps reduce itchiness caused by inflammation • Antihistamines – these work by blocking histamine receptors thereby reducing itching associated with eczema Phototherapy – this treatment uses ultraviolet A1 light waves applied to the skin two to three times per week under medical supervision; this helps decrease inflammation as well as improve psoriasis.

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  • Zlina Kozan

    I wanted to create such a page as I have been dealing with dyshidrotic eczema for a long time. On this page, I researched what came to my mind about dyshidrotic eczema and I will share the results with you. The information on this page is not treatment advice. Please consult your doctor first.

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